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Measles Alert: Make Sure You’re Protected

Measles Alert: Make Sure You’re Protected

Key facts

  • There are no measles cases in San Francisco.
  • The best way to prevent measles is to be vaccinated. The vaccine is highly effective.
  • The measles vaccine, called MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) has been available in the US for over 40 years. Many people have already received two doses of MMR vaccine and are considered immune to measles, but others may need one or two doses of vaccine. If you are not sure if you or a loved one is vaccinated, check with your doctor.

Learn more below.

1) What is happening now?
California has 59 reported cases of measles, seven of which have been reported in the Bay Area. Most of these cases are part of a large, ongoing outbreak linked to an initial exposure in December at Disneyland or Disney California Adventure Park in Anaheim, California. In addition, other cases have visited Disney parks while infectious in January. The California Department of Public Health recommends that any patient with symptoms similar to measles who has recently visited venues where international travelers congregate, such as theme parks, airports, etc., be considered to have a possible exposure to measles.

2) There are no measles cases in San Francisco
The California measles patients reside in 11 counties, not including San Francisco County.

3) What can you do?
Make sure you are protected against measles! The measles vaccine, called MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) has been available in the US for over 40 years. Many people have already received two doses of MMR vaccine and are considered immune to measles, but others may need one or two doses of vaccine.

People are considered immune to measles if they:
• Were born before 1957 or
• Have written documentation of two doses of MMR vaccine given at least 28 days apart or
• Have had measles infection confirmed by a physician before or
• Have received a blood test confirming immunity to measles

If you are uncertain if you are immune to measles, check your health records or contact your doctor. Any adult who needs MMR vaccine can visit:

The AITC Immunization and Travel Clinic – No appointment necessary – Drop In Clinic
Location: 101 Grove Street, Room 102
Hours: Mon, Wed, Thurs and Fri 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., Tues 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Cost: $95 per vaccine
Phone: 415-554-2625
Website: http://www.sfcdcp.org/aitc.html

If your child needs MMR vaccine and meets all of the criteria below, call (415) 206-2363 to find out where to go:
• Is 18 years of age or younger
• Does not already have a doctor
• Has Medi-Cal or no insurance or insurance that does not cover all vaccines
• Lives in San Francisco

For more information about measles:
• San Francisco Department of Public Health: http://www.sfcdcp.com/measles.html
• Centers for Disease Control: http://www.cdc.gov/measles/
• California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Outbreak Information: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/Pages/NR15-008.aspx
• CDPH Measles Information: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/HealthInfo/discond/Pages/Measles.aspx

4) What is measles?
Measles is a highly contagious respiratory disease caused by a virus. It begins with a fever that lasts for a couple of days, followed by a cough, runny nose and conjunctivitis (pink eye). A rash starts on the face and upper neck, spreads down the back and trunk, then extends to the arms and hands, as well as the legs and feet. Most people get better about a week after the rash develops. The disease can be more serious for some people causing middle ear infection, pneumonia or encephalitis (brain swelling).

5) How is measles spread?
Measles is spread by bodily fluids – drops of saliva from the mouth, mucus from the nose, coughing or sneezing, and tears from the eyes. The measles virus can also float in the air for up to two hours after someone with measles coughs or sneezes indoors. Someone who breathes air containing the measles virus can get measles. People with measles can spread the disease to others from four days before the rash starts (before they know they have the disease), through four days after the rash begins.

2016-10-04T15:11:13+00:00 January 23rd, 2015|